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قراءة كتاب The German War Some Sidelights and Reflections

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The German War
Some Sidelights and Reflections

The German War Some Sidelights and Reflections

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دار النشر: Project Gutenberg
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THE GERMAN WAR



THE GERMAN WAR

BY

ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE

AUTHOR OF “THE GREAT BOER WAR,” ETC.

HODDER AND STOUGHTON

LONDON   NEW YORK   TORONTO

MCMXIV



Printed in Great Britain by Hazell, Watson & Viney, Ld.,
London and Aylesbury



PREFACE

These essays, upon different phases of the wonderful world-drama which has made our lifetime memorable, would be unworthy of republication were it not that at such a time every smallest thing which may help to clear up a doubt, to elucidate the justice of our cause, or to accentuate the desperate need of national effort, should be thrown into the scale. The longest essay appeared in The Fortnightly Review and the shorter ones for the most part in The Daily Chronicle. I have left them as written at the time, even where after-events have caused some modification of my views.

Arthur Conan Doyle.

Windlesham, Crowborough,

November 1914.

[Pg vi]
[Pg vii]


CONTENTS

PAGE
  PREFACE v
I. THE CAUSES OF THE WAR 1
II. THE WORLD-WAR CONSPIRACY 32
III. THE DEVIL’S DOCTRINE 41
IV. THE GREAT GERMAN PLOT 55
V. THE “CONTEMPTIBLE LITTLE ARMY” 65
VI. A POLICY OF MURDER 79
VII. MADNESS 89
VIII. GREAT BRITAIN AND THE NEXT WAR 99
IX. AFTERTHOUGHTS 144
  FOOTNOTES
  TRANSCRIBER’S NOTES



I

THE CAUSES OF THE WAR

This article, stating the British case, was issued as a recruiting pamphlet in Great Britain, but was used abroad as a simple explanation which would enable neutrals to understand the true facts. It was published in full by fifty leading journals in the United States, and was translated into Dutch and Danish, 25,000 copies being distributed in each country.

The causes of the war are only of moment to us, at this stage, in that we gain more strength in our arms and more iron in our souls by a knowledge that it is for all that is honourable and sacred for which we fight. What really concerns us is that we are in a fight for our national life, that we must fight through to the end, and that each and all of us must help, in his own fashion, to the last ounce of his strength, that this end may be victory. That is the essence of the situation. It is not words and phrases that we need, but men, men—and always more men. If words can bring the men, then they are of avail. If not, they may well wait for the times to mend. But if there is a doubt in the mind of any man as to the justice of his country’s quarrel, then even a writer may find work ready to his hand.

Let us cast our minds back upon the events which have led up to this conflict. They may be divided into two separate classes—those which prepared the general situation, and those which caused the special quarrel. Each of these I will treat in its turn.

It is a matter of common knowledge, one which a man must be blind and deaf not to understand, that for many years Germany, intoxicated by her success in war and by her increase of wealth, has regarded the British Empire with eyes of jealousy and hatred. It has never been alleged by those who gave expression to this almost universal national passion that Great Britain had in any way, either historically or commercially, done Germany a mischief. Even our most bitter traducers, when asked to give any definite historical reasons for their dislike, were compelled to put forward such ludicrous excuses as that the British had abandoned the Prussian King in the year 1761, quite oblivious of the fact that the same Prussian King had abandoned his own allies in the same war under far more damaging circumstances, acting up to his own motto that no promises are binding where the vital interests of a State are in question. With all their malevolence they could give no examples of any ill turn done by us until their deliberate policy had forced us into antagonism. On the other hand, a long list of occasions could very easily be compiled on which we had helped them in some common cause from the days of Marlborough to those of Blücher. Until the twentieth century had turned they had no possible cause for political hatred against us. In commerce our record was even more clear. Never in any way had we interfered with that great development of trade which has turned them from one of the poorest to one of the richest of European States. Our markets were open to them untaxed, whilst

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