قراءة كتاب The Chronicles of Crime or The New Newgate Calendar. v. 1/2 being a series of memoirs and anecdotes of notorious characters who have outraged the laws of Great Britain from the earliest period to 1841.

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‏اللغة: English
The Chronicles of Crime or The New Newgate Calendar. v. 1/2
being a series of memoirs and anecdotes of notorious
characters who have outraged the laws of Great Britain
from the earliest period to 1841.

The Chronicles of Crime or The New Newgate Calendar. v. 1/2 being a series of memoirs and anecdotes of notorious characters who have outraged the laws of Great Britain from the earliest period to 1841.

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دار النشر: Project Gutenberg
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CHRONICLES OF CRIME

Edited by Camden Pelham

OF THE INNER TEMPLE BARRISTER-AT LAW
with
ILLUSTRATIONS FROM ORIGINAL DRAWINGS
BY PHIZ



Escape of the Mayor of Bristol. “His worship, seeing me, said, ‘For God’s sake, young man, assist me up.’ I stooped down & helped his worship up, the female servants assisting him behind.”


Escape of the Mayor of Bristol.

“His worship, seeing me, said, ‘For God’s sake, young man, assist me
up.’ I stooped down & helped his worship up, the female servants
assisting him behind.”
PHIZ

 

THE
CHRONICLES   OF   CRIME;
OR,
The New Newgate Calendar.
BEING
A SERIES OF MEMOIRS AND ANECDOTES
OF
NOTORIOUS CHARACTERS
WHO HAVE OUTRAGED THE LAWS OF GREAT BRITAIN FROM THE EARLIEST
PERIOD TO 1841.

COMPRISING

COINERS.
EXTORTIONERS.
FORGERS.
FRAUDULENT BANKRUPTS.
FOOTPADS.
HIGHWAYMEN.
HOUSEBREAKERS.
INCENDIARIES.
IMPOSTORS.
MURDERERS.
MUTINEERS.
MONEY-DROPPERS.
PIRATES.
PICKPOCKETS.
RIOTERS.
SHARPERS.
TRAITORS.
&c., &c.

INCLUDING
A NUMBER OF CURIOUS CASES NEVER BEFORE PUBLISHED.


EMBELLISHED WITH FIFTY-TWO ENGRAVINGS,
FROM ORIGINAL DRAWINGS BY “PHIZ.”

BY CAMDEN PELHAM, ESQ.,
OF THE INNER TEMPLE, BARRISTER-AT-LAW.

VOL. I.

LONDON:
T. MILES & CO., 95, UPPER STREET.
1887.

 


PREFACE

FEW words are necessary to introduce to our readers a work, the character and the object of which are so legibly written upon its title-page. “Chronicles of Crime” must comprise details, not only interesting to every person concerned for the welfare of society, but useful to the world in pointing out the consequences of guilt to be equally dreadful and inevitable. It is to be regretted that in most of the works of the present day, little attention is paid to the ultimate moral or beneficial effects to be produced by them upon the public mind; and that while every effort is made to afford amusement, no care is taken to produce those general impressions, so necessary to the maintenance of virtue and good order. The advantages of precept are everywhere admitted and extolled; but still more effectual are the lessons which are taught through the influence of example, whose results are but too frequently fatal. The representation of guilt with its painful and degrading consequences, has been universally considered to be the best means of warning youth against the danger of temptation;—the benefits to be expected from example are too plainly exhibited by the infliction of punishment to need repetition; and the more generally the effects of crime are shown, and the more the horrors which precede detection and the deplorable fate of the guilty are made known, the greater is the probability that the atrocity of vice may be abated and the security of the public promoted.

Having said thus much in recommendation of the object of this work, a few words as to its precise character may be added. Amusement and instruction are alike the results which are hoped to be secured. It is admitted by men, whose desire it is to make themselves acquainted with human nature, that jails and other places of confinement afford them a wide field for contemplation. The study of life, in all its varieties, is one no less interesting than useful. The ingenuity of thieves, depicted in their crimes, is a theme upon which all have opportunities to remark, in their passage through a life of communication with the world; and no less worthy of observation are the offences of men, whose outrages or cruelties have rendered them amenable to the laws, framed for the protection of society. All afford matter of contemplation to the mind, most likely to be attended with useful results. It may be observed that to persons of vicious inclination, effects the opposite to those which are suggested may be produced; but an answer as conclusive as it is just may be given to any such remark. The consequences of crime are as clearly exhibited as its motives and its supposed advantages, and few are hardy enough to declare or to exhibit a carelessness for punishment, or a contempt for the bitter fruits of their misdeeds. Presenting an example, therefore, of peculiar usefulness, it is trusted that the work will be found no less interesting than instructive. Combining these two most important qualities to secure its success, it is hoped that the patronage afforded it will be at least commensurate with the pains which have been bestowed upon its production.

It will be observed that in the preparation of these pages much care has been taken to preserve those features only which are likely to be acceptable to society. The most scrupulous attention has been paid to the rejection of such instances of guilt, the circumstances of which might be deemed unfit for general perusal. In a compass so circumscribed as that to which the work is confined, it would be impossible to give the history of every criminal who has undergone punishment for his offences, during the period to which our Chronicles extend: neither is that the object of the work. It is intended to embrace within its limits all those cases which from their details present outlines of attraction. The earlier pages are derived from sources of information peculiarly within the reach of the Editor, while those of a later period are compiled from known authorities as accurate as they are complete.

The comparison of the offences, and of the punishments of the last century, with those of more recent date, will exhibit a marked distinction between the two periods, both as to the atrocity of the one, and the severity of the other. Those dreadful and frequent crimes, which would disgrace the more savage tribes, and which characterised the lives of the early objects of our criminal proceedings, are now no longer heard of; and those characters of blood, in which the pages of our Statute-book were formerly written, have been wiped away by improved civilisation and the milder feelings of the people. It is but just to say that the provisions of a wise Parliament have not been unattended with proper results. Humanity has been permitted to temper the stern demands of justice; and however atrocious, it must be admitted, some of the crimes may be which have been recently perpetrated, and however numerous the offenders-it cannot be denied that the general aspect of the state of crime in this country is now infinitely less alarming than formerly.

The necessity for punishment as the consequence of crime, can neither be doubted nor denied. Without it the bonds of society must be broken—government in no form could be upheld. If, then, example be the object of punishment, and peace and good order, nay, the binding together of the community, be its effects, how useful must be a work, whose intention is to hold out that example which must be presumed to be the foundation of a well-ordered society.

The cases will be found to be arranged chronologically, which, it is presumed, will afford the most satisfactory and the most easy mode of reference. This advantage is, however, increased by the addition of copious indices.

London, July 1, 1840.


CONTENTS.

Note.The offence mentioned opposite to each name is that alleged against the person charged.

PAGE
Adams, Agnes. Forgery 505
Alden, Martha. Murder 445
Allen, George. Murder 444
Allen, William. Returned Transport 330
Armitage, Richard. Forgery 506
Aslett, Robert. Embezzlement 410
Atkins, James, alias Hill, alias Jack the Painter. Arson 269
Attaway, James. Burglary 226
Aram, Eugene. Murder 168
Avershaw, Lewis Jeremiah. Murder 347
   
Bailey, Richard. Burglary 226
Balfour, Alexander. Murder 3
Balmerino, Lord. Treason 107
Baltimore, Lord. Rape 213
Barrington, George, alias Waldron. Pickpocket 363
Bateman, Mary. Murder 458
Bellingham, John. Murder 527
Benson, Mary, alias Phipoe. Murder 358
Birmingham Riots (1780) 326
Blackburn, Joseph. Forgery 575
Blake, Joseph, alias Blueskin. Burglary 35
Blandy, Mary. Parricide 148
Bodkin, John, and Dominick. Murder 105
Bolland, James. Forgery 229
Bounty, Mutiny of 328
Bourne, John. Conspiracy public@vhost@g@gutenberg@html@files@46585@46585-h@46585-h-17.htm.html#page_332" class="pginternal"

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